HotelsPeople

‘Undervalued’ hospitality workers want 42.4% pay rise

The survey by Purple CV also found that British workers wanted 8.3 more days of paid annual leave

Professional CV writing specialists Purple CV, carried out a survey of 2,500 British workers and found that those in the hospitality sector believed they deserved an average of a 42.4% pay rise.
This is compared to lawyers who felt they deserved a 30% wage increase, charity workers who desired a 32.3% rise, and bankers who felt they deserved 41.1% more than their current salaries.

Tech workers were the least satisfied with their pay, wanting a 57.69% boost in salary.

The survey found that overall, Brits believed they deserved a 36.8% pay increase (£8,500.43 on top of their current average salary).

Workers in the North Eastern regions believed they were the most undervalued, and should be paid 45.4% more per year (£9,700.16). Those who are happiest with their current remuneration are the Welsh – they would be happy with just £6,298.50 (30%) extra per year.

Purple CV also found the nation’s workers felt they deserved an extra 8.3 days of paid annual leave.

The most burned-out region is Greater London – London-based respondents said they would want an extra 9.8 days according to the survey. The Welsh only wished for 5.8 more days per year.

Finally respondents were asked whether, given the choice, they would choose more pay or extra holiday days. And instead of choosing more time off, 63.2% of workers said they would prefer to take a higher salary. Almost every region across the UK was in agreement, except for East Midlanders where 56% would prefer extra holiday time.

Andrew Arkley, director of Purple CV, said: “It may seem an intimidating process to ask for a pay rise – even if we really want one. It’s all about approaching the situation with credible and objective reasons behind your request, maximising the chance for your employer to see your value as an employee. If the answer is no, then don’t let it get you down – you have ‘planted’ the seed for future opportunities and discussions.”

Back to top button